14 Tips to Improve Varicose Veins Naturally

14 Tips to Improve Varicose Veins Naturally

Many people suffer from varicose veins. Overweight, carrying heavy loads, feet injuries, pregnancies, and medications that contain estrogen can aggravate the problem. However there are ways to alleviated or prevent this phenomenon from getting worse.

When summer comes, it’s the time to pull out the swimsuits, sandals and shorts from the closet. But what do you do with all those ugly veins that look like bluish spiders or snakes tangling up under the skin? What causes them and how to prevent them?

What Causes Varicose Veins

It is thought that varicose veins are primarily an aesthetic problem, but it is important to know that varicose veins may indicate venous insufficiency – a medical problem that requires investigation and treatment.

Dilated veins in the legs may be due to a problem of the venous valves, whose role is to ensure the blood flows only in one direction – toward the heart and the legs. When these valves don’t function properly, blood flows to the legs, puts excess pressure on the walls of the veins causing them to expand, swell and protrude through the skin. This phenomenon of varicose veins is called in the medical language “venous insufficiency”. This is one of the common diseases in the world: one in two women and one in four men will suffer during their lifetime from varicose veins and venous insufficiency.

As mentioned above, overweight, carrying heavy loads, feet injuries, pregnancies, and medications that contain estrogen (such as birth control pills) may aggravate the problem. It was also found that it is particularly prevalent among people with professions that require prolonged standing, including surgeons, hair dressers, cashiers and sellers. Genetic weakness of the vein walls and valves, and excessive pressure in the veins are also among the causes for the phenomenon.

Dilated veins can cause swelling, edema, heaviness and pain in the feet, bleeding and infection, and sometimes even deep wounds and venous leg ulcers. In addition, patients may develop leg cramps, redness, skin color changes around the ankles, skin thickening and hardening of the legs and ankles, joint pain and more. More severe cases may develop inflammation of a vein.

Despite the prevalence of the disease, and the risks which it entails, only 10% of those with varicose veins treat the problem. While it is very hard to completely prevent the appearance of varicose veins, it is possible to delay and prevent it from getting worse.

How to Delay the Appearance of Varicose Veins?

1. Avoid standing or sitting for long periods without movement. If you need to stand for a long time, you should move your legs from time to time to avoid the stress resulting from the accumulation of blood.

2. Avoid strenuous physical activity which applies heavy pressure on the veins, such as weight training.

3. Exercise moderately such as walking or swimming. These activities may strengthen the walls of the blood vessels and prevent or delay the development of prominent veins. When you go, make sure you do a full motion from heel to toe. This movement stimulates the blood flow to the heart.

4. Avoid hot tubs, prolonged sauna, long stay in the sun and hot wax hair plucking. The heat involved in these activities expands the capillaries.

5. Make a cold or lukewarm showers. It shrinks the veins.

6. It is recommended to sit or lie down with your legs raised slightly. This position will improve the blood flow from the legs to the heart. When sitting, rest your feet on a chair or stool. When lying down, place a pillow under your feet, and make sure they slope upward.

7. Avoid sitting cross-legged. Such a sitting will increase pressure on the leg veins.

8. Apply elastic stockings or elastic bandages. These socks will not eliminate prominent veins, but they may prevent them from getting worse.

9. Be sure to wear comfortable shoes and avoid wearing high heels. Walking in high heels could exacerbate the phenomenon of prominent veins if it already exists. You can also read my previous article about how high heels harm you and how to make it better.

10. Maintain a healthy body weight. Being overweight puts unnecessary pressure on your veins.

11. Try to avoid situations of constipation that increase the pressure on the legs.

12. During long haul flights (and only after consulting and obtaining a prescription from your physician) take blood thinners such as aspirin to prevent blood clots and venous thrombosis. Also avoid prolonged sitting and make sure you move to prevent edema and reduce venous pressure in the legs. In addition, during long-haul flights make sure to wear elastic socks. If you fly frequently, you may want to read my article about 10 harmful things flying does to your body and what to do about it.

13. Take nutritional supplements (after consulting with your doctor). B vitamins, vitamin C, vitamin E and zinc help to maintain the elasticity of blood vessels and strengthen their walls and can prevent or delay the appearance of varicose veins.

14. Consume herbs for improving blood flow as bilberry and butcher’s broom. If you are interested in herbal remedies, you can find useful information in my e-book the Herbal Remedies Guide which will teach you how to treat common ailments using herbs.

How to Get Rid of Spider Veins

Spider veins are similar to varicose veins, but smaller. These tiny veins, found close to the surface of the skin, resemble spider webs or branches of a tree and are usually red, purple or blue.

Most often, spider veins are found on the legs (thighs, back of the calves, insides of the legs, ankles). This is due to the high pressures veins in the lower extremities have to endure – just think about the force of gravity, the pressure of body weight, and needing to carry blood all the way up to the heart!

If you suffer from spider veins, read my other post:

The Best Home Remedies to Get Rid of Spider Veins

53 Responses to 14 Tips to Improve Varicose Veins Naturally

  1. Sandie M. says:

    I would disagree with the weight lifing statement. I’ve lifted weights for years, 20+ and I’m 51 with no varicose veins.

    • admin says:

      Lucky you!

    • Scottro says:

      It’s not luck it is exercise working. If you are smart about weight training varicose veins are a non issue.

    • Tiffany says:

      That is for people who HAVE varicose veins..glad you don’t have that problem.. and I lifted heavy with them as well, this article is for TIPS to help reduce them..geez. Apparently you didn’t read it very well.

  2. DORIS FAVELA says:


    • mable says:

      It’s they’re almost gone, they’re not their!

      • Laura says:

        I’m sure there was a more polite way to correct her grammatical error. I’ve been working on the differences between their/they’re for a long time, and its still tough for him. But he’s trying, and the best form of teaching is patience and compassion.

      • Karen Bradley says:

        So many people r deficient in proper English.

    • Alicia says:

      I love to dance, and ready to try with Zumba, thanks for the tip!! Doing everything I can to reduce my varicose veins.

  3. Thanks for the advice

  4. judy miller says:

    Whats the best way besides surgery to get rid of varicose veins that r bad

  5. irene maquibulan says:

    Thanks for your tip

  6. Salim hashim sumra says:

    Like to join health tips and thanks for
    The tips

  7. Celia Mendes says:

    I have varicose vains and sonetimes they are very painfull.
    I start walk a lot we see if that results.

    • Linda Pickering says:

      I have painful varicose veins also and I tried the all-natural power strips on them with amazing results. Not only did it help with the pain but it works with the bodys energy to repair . The testimonials were amazing so I had to try them. You can find them on http://www.freepainrelief.com/linda

  8. chandrakant says:

    Thank for your tip.

  9. Karen says:

    I have a question…both of my parents have varicose veins and both grandmothers. I am 36 and I have them but not bad. My dad says poor circulation in the legs can cause fatigue. Last fall I tried to work out regularly and started jogging also. Anytime I do cardio, even if it’s lite, I feel so run down and fatigued afterwards and sometimes it lasts 2-3 days. I literally stopped all exercising to avoid the feeling. Recently, I decided to do some push ups, sit ups, squats and stretches and I did very little…I still felt fatigued and achey like I was getting the flu later that day. I’ve researched what could be causing this and one theory is toxins are releasing into my blood stream when I exert energy but I think it could be a circulation problem and possibly verifies vein related. Has anyone else experienced this?

    • Jenny says:

      Hi Karen, I’ve seen references of other people who complain about the same thing, but there might be several reasons for that feeling. If I were you I would talk about it with a doctor who is able to do the required tests to see if you lack a certain nutrient or whether there is another hidden problem.

    • Bibi says:

      Hi Karen. Have you been checked out for fibromyalgia?

    • David says:

      I had (claudication)medical term which is blockage of your arteries.I had to insist my doctor send me to have a cardiac stress test.A month later I had a stint put in lower left hip.I had suffered for many years with fatigue and muscle cramping from working, walking and trouble dancing.The doctor tried to send me to a fibromyalgia specialist, no way once there you will never find out the truth and may spend the rest of your life on drugs.After 4 months I can feel my bodies flow balancing.I can walk and work again after 2 years of fighting doctors so be i

    • Mustafa Haji Alwy says:

      Karen may get hypothyroid problem for continued fatigue. Mustafa Haji Alwy 2014

  10. Juliana says:

    I wonder why Omega-3 and Fish oil is not mentioned??

    • Jenny says:

      Hi Juliana, according to Livestrong website, fish oil and omega-3s don’t appear to help varicose veins (http://www.livestrong.com/article/494208-does-fish-oil-help-varicose-veins-in-the-legs/). However I’ve seen other references that mention that essential fatty acids such as omega 3 or flax seed oil can help to reduce the pain and inflammation associated with varicose veins. It’s impossible for me to include all the solutions in one article. This is not a “closed list”. This is why people can share with other readers their experience if something has helped them.

  11. Monte Arnold says:

    Also missed, is hydro therapy shunting, exfoliation, and lymphatic drainage massage.

    And like almost every other time I hear someone say weight lifting is bad, I’m calling that misinformation.

    More specifically, some exercise movements or intensities would need to be modified for extensive vascular damage.

  12. Lyndsay McDade says:

    It can also be what I have which is called Vasovagal Syncope or also known as Cardio Neurogenic Syncope. It is when your blood pools in your feet like explained previously, but it can lead to fainting spells if not treated. I never knew what this was until June of last year what I was going through.

  13. Maryam says:

    My vericose viens disturb me when I’m pregnant. The last pregnancy was the worst. The appearance and pain subsided after I gave birth, but I still experience pain especially in the foot after standing for long. I am a teacher, then I have to do some chores that require standing like ironing. It helps When I use crepe bandage though. The thing is I want another baby but when I remember the excruciating pain I went through with vericose veins , I get scared. Should I not get pregnant again? I have been avoiding going for help to the hospital until I wean my baby because I don’t know what treatment might be involved.

    • Jenny says:

      There are several medical treatments available for people with serious problems of varicose veins and it’s always good to hear what the options are. Going for a consultation to get more information doesn’t come with any obligation to do the treatment, but at least you will be able to make an informed decision.

    • Wendy says:

      I had very painful varicose veins while pregnant with my 3rd (family history of bad varicose veins also). A homeopath I asked about it, told me to take Citrus Bioflavenoids with Hesperidin, and to use a Calendula cream topically on them. I’m not sure if it prevented them from getting worse, but it did take the pain away.

  14. Jane saldajeno says:

    I have varicose veins in my legs and also those tiny purple veins in my feet that swell when i get tired due to long standing.. I’m only 24-25 when i had those, 29 now can’t imagine the feeling every night sometimes can’t sleepwhen my feet aches.. It helps when i put pillows under my feet. I also did soaked my feet in hot water, tolerable level. Is it helpful, or bad? Actually doing it several times! Shocking to read that its not applicable maybe the reason also why im still suffering from it.. Please advice or give some tips to do at home. Tnx :)

    • Jenny says:

      Hi Jane, soaking your legs in hot water is not a good idea as it expand the veins. Generally speaking, home treatment is recommended for most people with varicose veins that aren’t causing more serious problems, and for that you can use the tips in the article. However if the varicose veins cause you too much pain or discomfort, you might need a medical consultation about suitable procedures that are currently available.

    • Brandy says:

      Hello Jane,
      I wanted to comment to encourage you to try HappyFeet. I work for the company, I travel working trade shows selling HappyFeet. They are a fluid orthotic… They are an insole filled with glycerine. The glycerine creates a massage while you walk or stand, increasing blood flow an average of 53%! As noted in this article blood flow or the lack thereof actually, contributes greatly to the accurence of vericose veins. Please check them out!!!

  15. Upal says:

    I have varicose veins in my right leg. I started since last August after a traumatic injury at my right ankle during playing football. I almost try everything mentioned above. My question is when can I expect to cure my leg edema completely. One more thing I used to do 1 hour walking and 2 hour cycling at weekends. I stopped these are the physical activities since my injury. When can I expect to start these again. I am 35 years old, my height is 5 feet 7 inches and weight 75 kg. I take high BP medicine- Amlodipine 5mg regularly. My leg swelling has improved a lot but it has not gone away completely. After my 9 hours office duty my leg swells a bit regularly. I use crepe bandage while doing office.
    Please advice me when this will be cured completely

    • Jenny says:

      I suspect you may have a sprained ankle and in this case treatment depends on the severity of the injury. Although self-care treatment may be all you need, because you still have swelling, a medical evaluation might be necessary to find out how badly you’ve sprained your ankle and what is needed to put you on the path to recovery.

  16. Julie says:

    I also suffer with varicose veins. I had surgery two years ago to remove them. Now they are back. They cause me dicomfort & appearance isn’t appealing.

  17. Konesoang says:

    Can you say something about lymphedema please

  18. Melissa Will says:

    veno rid serum is best for varicose veins

  19. harvey says:

    My father is suffering from varicose veins for almost 10 years he is now 65yrs old, the appearance of his left leg was already bad because of that situation. The leg and the ankle on his left is swollen terribly, what treatment could you say to me that would help him get back his confidence for him self.

    • Jenny says:

      Hi Harvey, the fact that one leg and ankle are terribly swollen means that your father really needs to see a doctor. There might be many causes for swollen feet such as lymphedema, venous insufficiency, infection, blood clot, or heart, liver, or kidney problem. I am not a doctor and can’t know the cause of the problem. This needs to be treated by a doctor who knows your father’s health history and is able to perform the required tests. I apologize I cannot be of any help.

  20. Atlas Stands says:

    I’ve been using veno rid serum for several years now, not only on my face, but also the delicate skin on my chest. It is a skin care product I would not go without as the results are amazing. My greatest praise would be for the capillary strengthening/redness reduction in my fair skin.

  21. sneezy says:

    I started jogging hoping to lose weight ,but now am n trouble my vein now has gotten bigger and painful.Having to do all the house chores and am not coping ,no money for surgery.maybe can try some herbs help people.

  22. Britney Moullette says:

    try to use veno rid serum which good for for the treatment of spider veins but like everything onthe market, it takes time and patience but works in the long run

  23. Michael Siegfried says:

    DermalMD Serum works sooo good.i finally can get some sleap .and my husband absolutely loves this product because he can sleap .before leg veins i would be up all night shaking my legs and sometimes arms.now i sleap so well.

  24. Roxanna says:

    I have been using venorid for about a month. So far I have not noticed any improvement in the spider veins. The general redness has not improved either. I will continue to use this for another month to see if it will help. Thank you.

  25. Suzanna says:

    What would you recommend? I am 48, in good shape, have no swelling or visible signs of varicose veins or spider veins, but I was having consistent, deep aching pain in my right calf, along with sometimes feeling burning and itching feelings. I had a doppler ultrasound which identified some venous insufficiency in my Great Saphenous vein and my femoral vein. It was recommended that I wear a compression stocking for 3 months which I did. Sometimes it helped, sometimes not. Endovenous ablation surgery was recommended to remove the Great Saphenous vein and the vein specialist said that it was a highly successful surgery. I had that done, but the pain in my leg is still there and has not gone away in the slightest. The vein Dr. had no answer and recommended that I see a neurologist to get my nerves tested. I did that and the nerves were fine. Do you think the vein surgery just didn’t work or could the pain be caused by the femoral vein? I’ve had the pain for 2 years now and just don’t know what to do or where to go? Thank you.

    • Jenny says:

      Hi Suzanna, you are asking me a tough question that unfortunately I don’t have the knowledge to answer (I’m not a doctor). Probably the best recommendation will be to go to a second opinion from another specialist to review the whole case with fresh eyes. Keep in mind that doctors are often faced with unusual or challenging cases and may have different training or experience. Many general medical cases are straightforward but your situation/diagnosis is unclear and you’re not responding to a treatment as expected, and this is where a second opinion comes. I apologize I cannot give a more specific advice.

  26. Jeremy Rodriguez says:

    I suffer from varicose and spider veins and my last pregnancy made them much worse. In addition to them being horribly unsightly they are extremely painful! Looking into why I have developed these awful veins I learned that are hereditary, from standing, birth control pills and hormones too. I guess since all of these factors are me I should not be surprised that I have them. Treatment is very expensive and not covered by my insurance. So, I guess saline injections, laser treatments, radio frequency or surgery is out of the question! Like most of us these days I took to the internet and found a great product called venorid serum that seems to be providing some relief. This product is a mixture of Herbs, vitamins and minerals that support the tissue and deliver nutrients at a molecular level to promote regeneration. It strengthens both veins and blood flow and has given me great relief. I feel more self confidence and am back to wearing my favorite pair of shorts too!

    • Joanne says:

      Hello Jeremy
      I am suffering from varicose veins also i am yet to visit my doctor about the problem as they are starting to cause me discomfort. Where did you get this product from and how quickly did you see and feel the results?

      many thanks

  27. Chris says:

    A co-worker has just had surgery for her varicose veins. The clinic she went to advised her to never sit with her feet on the floor or dangling, wear compression stockings designed for diabetics as much as possible, even after all healed, and keep her feet up as much as possible. All of the ladies at the clinic follow their own advice as well. By the way this co-worker is not overweight and exercises regularly but we work on our feet all day. There are also some great natural remedies if you search for them, that have been used for centuries to increase blood flow. I am about to try and make some of them to use for myself. Good luck to all of us and cheers from Vancouver 😉

  28. Christina Wernke says:

    Normally I’m not one to focus on the looks of my body, but I was not able to get passed these varicose veins that are taking over my lower leg. Thanks to venorid serum: The Varicose and Spider Vein Solution for allowing my calves to look much more attractive. I literally saw results within the first two weeks of using this. More importantly, I had no hesitation whatsoever considering I was practically trying the product for free. If I wasn’t satisfied with this product, I knew that I could get my money back. Fortunately, venorid serum has worked tremendously and I can’t wait to tell my friends!

  29. ugos says:

    I have varicose veins in my scrotum (Varicocele) pls what can I do about it

    • Jenny says:

      I don’t know about home/natural remedies for this, but there are several medical procedures to target the problem, but you need to discuss it with your doctor (treatment may not be necessary unless your varicocele causes pain, fertility problems or other issues).

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