10 Causes of Hair Loss and How to Treat Them

10 Causes of Hair Loss and How to Treat Them
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Whether your hair is long, short, straight of curly, hair is an expression of our own individual style, personality and attitude. Research does show that hair and self-image are closely linked. if you are noticing an unusual and prolonged hair loss, then you should visit your doctor. If you are curious about the causes of hair loss, then look no further than the page you are reading right now: unexplained, excessive hair loss can be worrying and scary but the good news is, there’s often a way to fix it. Here are 10 causes of hair loss and how to treat them.

1. Nutritional Deficiencies

Are you getting enough Vitamin D? Maintaining proper vitamin D levels is one of the 70 habits featured in my e-book 70 Powerful Habits For A Great Health which will guide you how to take positive steps to improve your wellness and overall health.

One of the symptoms of vitamin D deficiency is hair loss. In order to up your intake of vitamin D, get out more! Lack of exposure to the sun’s rays almost guarantees you to become vitamin deficient. However, if where you live, the weather is awfully cold and rainy, then you can supplement your vitamin D intake with a supplement. Read more about vitamin D in my article about the 12 common diseases caused by vitamin D deficiency.

Deficiencies of the amino acid lysine, copper, and zinc, may also cause hair loss. Also, make sure that you are getting enough protein. Hair stands are composed of protein, but if you not consuming enough of it, the body is clever and will divert its use from making hair to sustaining more necessary bodily functions. If you are not a mea eater, you can read my article about 13 surprising Sources of meat free protein. Also read my article about 5 essential nutrients you may be missing from your diet.

2. Hormonal Imbalance

A women’s hormones can start to decline and lose balance from the age of 30, which can cause hair loss. This can be brought on by excessive dihydrotestosterone (DHT) conversion. Even though estrogen is the main hormone that women produce, testosterone and other androgens such as DHEA also occur in the female body. As women reach a certain age, they may begin to convert these androgens to DHT.

There is a big scope of hormonal issues that can cause hair loss in women. Here are some of them:

Thyroid issues – The thyroid is a gland at the front of the neck. If the gland produces too much or not enough of the thyroid hormone, then the hair growth cycle may change. However, if you do have a thyroid issue, hair loss is rarely the only symptom. Other symptoms include weight gain or loss, sensitivity to cold or heat, and changes in heart-rate. Read more about the symptoms in my previous article about
top 13 signs that you may have a thyroid disorder.

PCOS – Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have a hormonal imbalance which creates higher levels of androgens than normal. This often causes hair to grow on the face and body, while hair on the head grows thinner. PCOS can also lead to ovulation problems, acne, and weight gain.

Pregnancy – Women may find that their hair is thicker during pregnancy. This is due to high levels of hormones that keep resting hairs from falling out as they usually would. However, after the baby is born, when hormones go back to how they were, these strands fallout. This can be alarming, but hair should return to normal, although this may take up to two years.

Birth Control Pills – A lot of women aren’t aware of this, but one of the potential side-effects of the pill is hair loss. The hormones in the pill that suppress ovulation can cause hair to thin, particularly in women with a family history of hair loss. Sometimes hair loss can occur when you stop taking the pill. Other drugs associated with hair loss are blood thinners and medicines that treat high blood pressure, heart disease, arthritis, and depression.

3. Extreme stress

Extreme stress can cause sudden hair loss. The shedding could last several months months. It is important that we know how to relax and wind down. Life is meant to enjoyed after all! Minimizing stress will reduce your chances of experiencing hair loss. You can try whatever helps you to relax, such as these meditation techniques, relaxing aromatherapy bath, or seek professional help.

4. Hair products containing toxic chemicals

Sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) is found is nearly all shampoos available in shops. As well as having toxic effects on your immune system, SLS has been proven to corrode hair follicles and impede hair growth. There are shampoos available made from natural ingredients which do not contain SLS or you can try this coconut milk shampoo. Go easy on the hair dye too. Over-treated hair can lead to hair loss due to the toxic chemicals found in dyes and styling products.

5. Extreme weight loss and crash diets

You may lose weight with crash diet, but you may also lose your hair. If you have lost 15 pounds, then it may only be after 3-6 months when you notice any hair loss. However, hair should grow back after you return to eating a healthy balanced diet. If your diet is deficient in Vitamin A or protein, then you are more likely to experience hair loss.

6. Tight Hairstyles

Although cornrows look funky, bear in mind that when you take them out, a noticeable amount of hair may fall out too. If you wear your hair up tightly or use rollers too often, then that can also lead to hair loss. So relax and let your hair down, and then it should grow back.

7. Side effect of cancer treatments

It is well known that both chemo and radiation therapy causes dramatic hair loss. While the treatment kills cancer cells, it also damages the hair follicles. However, the hair loss is usually short lived and hair grows back after the course of treatment has finished.

8. Medical conditions

Some medical conditions can cause hair loss. For example:

Scalp Psoriasis – Scalp psoriasis, when severe, may cause an increase in shedding of hair. However, hair growth can recover following effective treatment. Although scalp psoriasis is hard to treat, there are many treatments that are effective. Have a look at my previous article about 11 natural ways to relieve psoriasis.

Alopcia Areta – This is an auto immune disease that causes hair to fall out in patches. This is due to the body’s own immune system, which by mistake, attacks healthy hair follicles. Usually, the damage is not permanent and the patches grow back in six months to a year. It is only in rare cases that people may lose all of the hair on their head and body.

Folliculitis – Folliculitis is a term for local inflammation of hair follicles. It appears like acne with rings of inflammation surrounding the opening of a hair follicle. As the folliculitis progresses the hair often falls out. When folliculitis is severe, the inflammation is so extreme that it can actually permanently destroy the hair follicles, leaving small bald patches. There are forms of folliculitis which are non-infectious such as those caused by oils and greases applied to the skin that clog up the hair follicles, but folliculitis is usually due to a bacterial infection. Some topical antibiotics like bacitracin, mycitracin, or neomycin can be used to treat minor folliculitis. For more serious infections oral antibiotics are given such as erythromycin, or griseofulvin if the infection is fungal in nature.

Ringworm – When the scalp is affected by ringworm, the fungus causes hair to fall out and form itchy, round bald patches. Bald areas look scaly and red. The fungus is contagious by direct contact, so family members should keep an eye out for symptoms on themselves. Some types of ringworm infections will clear up on their own and so no treatment is necessary, and some of of them can be treated with these home remedies. If treatment is needed then an antibiotic called Griseofulvin can be used.

Seborrheic dermatitis – Seborrheic dermatitis is not an infectious disease, but it can involve infection. It is a skin condition, but temporary hair loss can occur if the dermatitis is located on the scalp or other skin areas on the body. The dermatitis appears scaly, sometimes oily and inflamed. It can also be itchy and painful to touch.

There are many treatments available for seborrheic dermatitis. The most simple form of treatment involves the use of medicated anti-dandruff shampoo. Some dermatologists may also prescribe antibiotics to control the skin flora which can reduce the inflammation. The inflammation may be treated by a corticosteroid cream or lotion to control the immune response. Seborrheic dermatitis can be very persistent once it occurs so it is important the treatment is used even when the symptoms have passed, in order to prevent it.

9. Aging

As we age, the rate in which our hair grows, slows down. Hair strands get smaller and have less pigment, and hair becomes thinner, finer, and grey. In order to keep your hair healthy, eat whole foods which help to keep your body youthful, as well as your hair. If you have premature grey hair, you can find here natural supplements that can help you.

10. Genetics

Hereditary hair loss affects about 30 million American women, according to the America Academy of Dermatology. Although it mostly occurs in the late 50s or 60s, it can happen at any time, even during teenage years.

If you suffer from hair loss, you need to find the cause of the problem to find the best treatment plan for you. It is important to treat the underlying cause of hair loss and not just the symptom itself. Parallel to this, you can stimulate hair growth at home with rosemary – get all the details below:

How to Use Rosemary for Treating Hair Loss

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16 Responses to 10 Causes of Hair Loss and How to Treat Them

  1. Maria says:

    So informative,thanks for sharing. Now I’m aware I’m losing too much hair & I think it’s more because of stress.

  2. arlene says:

    I have the same problem

  3. Laura says:

    Hi Jenny,

    I used to have such thick hair. People would comment on how lucky I was to have such strong, thick hair. Within about one year and a half, I lost more than half of my hair. I was 19 when that happened. Now 23, it has gotten a bit better but I still have extremely thin hair. Most of it has thinned at my scalp. I have also noticed the hair on my body has thinned as well. My mom has extremely thin hair, but her hair didn’t begin thinning until her 30s. When I was 19, I was under stress, but think there might be another issue at play. I took a visit to my MD and she told me that birth control might helped, however I haven’t seen a significant change from being on it the past couple of years. Do you think the issue could be hormones? Any advice you can give would help.

    thanks,

    • Jenny says:

      Hi Laura, It’s hard to tell what’s the exact cause (I’m not a doctor), but I think it worth further investigating. You can consider consultation with a dermatologist who has an interest in hair loss disorders. They can sometimes be difficult to find, as not all board certified dermatologists are experts in the most recent advances in diagnosis and treatment of hair loss.

  4. I stated loss hair when i was 13 but not too much, just after gave birth to my first born in 2012 then more hair loss i faced compare to the amount falling before…and this year 2015 just after gave birth to my second born in May, 2015…I face now a very big problem of hair loss which cause some baldness on my head…pls I really need your help..I’m from Tuvalu which is in the Pacific Region, and some oil and those kind of product that you talking about, I don’t have that in here, please I really need your help

  5. tonia says:

    Hello Jenny
    Normally,I don’t have much hair in front but it got worse after I pulled out a bonding gum from my hair. My front hairline is almost bald for 6 years now. I’ve tried several hair products without any improvement. I don’t know what else to do.

  6. Selena says:

    Hi,
    I crash dieted when i was 13 and ended up losing a lot of hair. My hair is really thin, so much that you can see my scalp. The worst thing is i didnt know what to do. I ate junk food/ unhealthy foods afterwards and im now 19 stressing out whether or not ill get my hair back. Im going to try eating healthy and take this hair bio 30 vitamin. I would be grateful for some advice

  7. Rakhi Sharma says:

    Hey, I want to use a mixture of Castor oil and rosemary oil for my major hair loss. only one concern that my skin has a pimple tendency… I hope I do not get pimple on my face after oiling 🙁

  8. Reenu says:

    Hello.i have hair loss problem.but i was searching for the the reason that i am suffering from. That is sweating a lot. In summers i face more hair loss than in winters and the reason being is sweating. Can castor oil help me in such problem

  9. saqib says:

    hello , i have hair loss problem last 6 year par day 300 plus hair fall. i use many thing but i tired,its too much dandruff in my scalp what i do please suggest. please reply back

  10. pradeep kumar says:

    I am 22 year, my hair fall down from 2012 and baldness is visible. my father have also baldness of hair. So sir please tell me what I used to regain our hair and 100 precent effective

    • Jenny Hills says:

      There is no 100% success or guarantee with any product or treatment. This is because every person is different, and results vary between different people. You can try some of the natural methods to encourage hair growth (see information HERE), but this is a slow process and patience is required. It usually takes several months to see results. Some people find these methods helpful to some degree while for others they will not do the job. The only way to know is to try.

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